City College of San Francisco
Course Outline of Record
Course Status: Active
I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION
A. Approval Date December 2013
B. Effective Semester No Semester Provided
C. Department Interdisciplinary Studies
D. Course Number IDST 36
E. Course Title Poetry for the People
F. Course Outline Originator System Loaded
G. Department Chairperson Lauren Muller
H. Dean Ray Gamba
II. COURSE SPECIFICS
A. Hours
Lecture: 52.5
Homework: 105
Total Hours: 157.5
B. Units 3
C. Prerequisite None
    Corequisite None
    Pre/Corequisite None
    Advisory None
    Advisory Pre/Corequisite None
D. Course Justification UC transfer course meets Humanities and Diversity GE requirements. IGTCE transfer to UC and CSU. Seeking American Cultures graduation requirement.
E. Field Trips Optional
    Description of Field Trips Optional
F. Method of Grading Letter or Pass/No Pass
G. Repeatability Course is not repeatable
III. CATALOG DESCRIPTION
An interdisciplinary approach toward development of literacy in multiple popular traditions of poetry, including in social justice movements, by incarcerated people and through alternative media. Includes scrutiny of published poems from multiple cultural traditions, a focus on community, and the cultivation and public presentation of new poems.
IV. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:
  1. Evaluate the ways people in diverse cultures have used poetry to sustain community, correct stereotypes, preserve cultural memory, and respond to violence
  2. Compare and contrast the aesthetic features of poetic forms from diverse cultures, including their transformation across time
  3. Apply poetic terms in written analysis (close readings) in order to make informed value judgments
  4. Compose, revise, and produce poems that emulate and engage in dialogue with the poetry studied in the class
  5. Design, plan, and produce an event that presents original poetry to the community in a public performance
  6. Identify and compare the historical and cultural/aesthetic qualities of poetry from different ethnic/racial groups, women, lesbians, gays, bisexual, and transgendered persons
  7. Design and execute a project that uses various types of media to takes poetry to the community and demonstrates socio-cultural participation skills, decision making abilities, and political awareness
V. CONTENTS
  1. Poetry that sustains community, corrects stereotypes, preserves cultural memory, and responds to violence
    1. Community in multiple contexts
      1. Martin Luther King and "The Beloved Community"
      2. Ethnicity
      3. Gender
      4. Sexual orientation
      5. Geographical location (e.g., neighborhood, region, country)
      6. Physical limitations
      7. Incarcerated state (e.g., jail, prison, refugee camp)
      8. Labor conditions
    2. Harlem Renaissance
    3. Black Arts Movement
      1. Protest poetry
      2. Affirmation poetry
      3. Jazz poetry
    4. Native American Renaissance and twenty-first century indigenous poetry, including Pacific Islanders
    5. Poetry from prison and internment camps.
    6. Poetry from social movements such as the Chinese Democracy Movement, disability rights, queer rights, poetry responding to war
    7. Latino/a and Latin American poetic movements
    8. Poetry from and about the Middle East.
    9. Poetry and new social media
  2. Aesthetic features of poetic forms from diverse cultures, including their transformation across time
    1. Blues, son, corrido
    2. Blues, jazz poetry, hip hop
    3. Sonnet
    4. Ghazal
    5. Haiku, tanka, renga, hokku
    6. Classical ode and Latin American ode
    7. Tang poetry
    8. Dramatic Monologue
  3. Poetic terms and close reading
    1. Figures of speech (metaphor, simile, personification, extended metaphor, etc.)
    2. Music and rhythm (assonance, alliteration, rhyme, sibilance, vertical rhythm, horizontal rhythm)
    3. Image
    4. Diction and voice
    5. Line breaks (enjambment, end rhyme)
    6. Persona
    7. Irony
  4. Poetry workshops
    1. Emulation poems
    2. Guidelines and techniques for revising a poem
  5. Design and production of a public performance of poetry
    1. Outreach
    2. Venue
    3. Program
    4. Skills for performing poetry in public
    5. Guest Poets
  6. Design and execution of a project that takes poetry to the community and demonstrates socio-cultural participation skills, decision-making abilities, and political awareness
    1. Proposal
    2. Plan
    3. Implement
    4. Field project narratives
VI. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY
  1. Assignments
    1. In-class activity: Readings, discussions, and written responses on topics such as the ways people in diverse cultures have used poetry to sustain community, correct stereotypes, preserve cultural memory, and respond to violence. Readings include essays by published poets, as well as essays and poems by CCSF faculty and poetry for the people students.
    2. In-class activity: Participation in large and small group activities in which students apply poetic terms and analyze poems in close readings in order to make informed value judgments.
    3. In-class activity: Participation in workshops to write, revise, and share poems that emulate and engage in dialogue with the poetry studied in the class.
    4. In-class activity: "Open mic" within the class.
    5. In-class activity: Small group presentations to identify and compare the historical and cultural/aesthetic qualities of poetry from different ethnic/racial groups, women, lesbians, gays, bisexual, and transgendered person.
    6. In-class activity: Notes and written responses assessing group presentations and presentations by guest poets.
    7. In-class activity: Planning poetry event and field projects.
    8. In-class activity: Optional field trips to poetry readings at neighboring campuses, community centers, and bookstores.
    9. Out-of-class assignment: Written responses and short papers that evaluate and compare and contrast poems, poetic forms, and poetic movements, including comparing and contrasting the aesthetic features of poetic forms from diverse cultures, including their transformation across time
    10. Out-of-class assignment: Field project and teaching proposals and field project narrative.
    11. Out-of-class assignment: Present original poetry to the community in a public performance.
    12. Out-of-class assignment: Design and execute a field project that takes poetry to the community and demonstrates socio-cultural participation skills, decision-making abilities, and political awareness.
  2. Evaluation
    1. Other: In class writings, discussions, presentations, and workshops as described above evaluating the use of poetry to sustain community, correct stereotypes, preserve cultural memory, and respond to violence; comparing and contrasting the aesthetic features of poetic forms; applying poetic terms and analyzing poems in close readings; writing, revising and sharing poems; performing in class and in public; comparing the historical and cultural/aesthetic qualities of poetry, notes on in-class presentations and guest poets, proposing poetry events and field projects).
    2. Other: Quizzes in which students identify, then compare and contrast, the aesthetic features of poetic forms from diverse cultures, including their transformation across time.
    3. Other: Short papers, proposals, and narratives, as described above, such as teaching proposals, field project proposals, field project narratives, and optional reflections on field trips.
    4. Other: Implementation of events, including presentation of poetry in a public performance.
    5. Other: Final exam in which students provide close analysis of poems and essays, including analysis of their own poems and poems by other CCSF students.
  3. Representative Textbooks and Other Instructional Materials
    1. Required text: Course reader that features poets, poetic forms, essays, and poetic movements as described above, as well as poems and essays by CCSF students and faculty.
    2. Supplementary books and publications available from the department and campus libraries, such as: a. Addonizio, Kim and Laux, Dorianne. A Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures a/Writing Poetry. W.W. Norton and Co., 1997. b. Boykoff, Jules and Sand, Kaia. Eds. Guerrilla Poetry and Public Space. Pahn Press, 2008. c. Candalaria, Xochiquetzal. Empire (Camino del Sol). U of Arizona Press, 2011. d. Coles, Katherine, Ed. Blueprints, Building Poetry into Communities. The Poetry Foundation, 2011. (Free e book available on line at http://www.poetryfoundation.org/foundationlblueprints) e. Espada, Martin. Poetry Like Bread Poetry 0/ the Political Imagination. New Expanded Edition. Curbstone Press, 2000. f. Finch, Annie. A Poet's Craft: A Comprehensive Guide to Making and Sharing Your Poetry. University of Michigan Press, 2012. g. Forche, Carolyn. Ed. Against Forgetting: Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness, W.W. Norton and Co., 1993. h. Jason, Philip K. and Lefkowitz, Allan B. Creative Writer's Handbook. 5th edition. Longman, 2009. i. Michaels, Judith Rowe. Risking Intensity: Reading and Writing Poetry with High School Students. National Council of Teachers of English, 1999. J. Muller, Lauren, Ed. June Jordan's Poetry for the People: A Revolutionary Blueprint. Routledgel Francis Taylor, 1995. k. Nowak, Mark. Coal Mountain Elementary. Coffee House Press, 2009. l. Rosen, Kim. Saved by A Poem: The Transformative Power of Words. Hay House, Inc. 2009. m. Rowell, Charles Henry. Angels of Ascent: A Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry. W.W. Norton and Co, 2013. n. Sand, Kaia. Remember to Wave. Tinfish Press, 2010. o. Simon, Leslie. Collisions and Transformations. New and Selected Poems: 1975 -1991. Coffeehouse Press, 1992.
    3. Audiovisual resources, websites, and social media, such as: a. American Academy of Poets http://www.poets.org/ b. Griffm, Ada Mae and Parkerson, Michelle. A Litany for Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde. Third World Newsreel, 1995. c. Lambda Literary Organization http::llwww.larnbdaliterary.org/ d. Light, Allie and Saraf, Willie. Mitsuye and Nellie: Asian American Poets. Women Make Movies. 1981. e. Parmar, Pratibha. A Place of Rage. Women Make Movies, 1991. f. Poetry Foundation http://www.poetryfoundation.org/ g. Poets Against SB 1040 https:llwww.facebook.comIPoetryOfResistance h. Poetry Workshops with Labor Unions http://www.poetryfoundation.orglharriet/2012/04/domestic-workersunited- writers-workshop/). i. IISpiit This Rockll http://www.splitthisrock.org/
VII. TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION
CREDIT/DEGREE APPLICABLE (meets all standards of Title 5. Section 55002(a))