City College of San Francisco
Course Outline of Record
Course Status: In Review
I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION
A. Approval Date January 2020
B. Effective Semester Spring 2021
C. Department Behavioral Sciences
D. Course Number ANTH 50
E. Course Title Anthropology of Cannabis
F. Course Outline Originator Jennifer Dawgert-Carlin
F. Co-Contributor(s):
Jessica Amato
G. Department Chairperson Jennifer Dawgert-Carlin
H. Dean Jill Yee
II. COURSE SPECIFICS
A. Hours
Lecture: 52.5
Homework: 105
Total Hours: 157.5
B. Units 3
C. Prerequisite None
    Corequisite None
    Pre/Corequisite None
    Advisory ENGL 88 or ESL 188 or readiness for college-level English
    Advisory Pre/Corequisite None
D. Course Justification The course is designed for general education and/or for those majoring in one of the behavioral sciences or cannabis-related studies. The course will broaden offerings in Anthropology to include Cannabis Studies, Medical Anthropology, Ethnobiology, and Ethnomedicine. It will be of value to individuals in understanding the evolving cultural landscape and understanding the subfields of the discipline through a specific topic. This is a new request to meet the requirements in Social and Behavioral Sciences of CCSF GE area D, CSU GE Area D, IGETC Area 4 and elective requirements for the AA-T/Anthropology at CCSF. The course will also be one of the required courses in the forthcoming Cannabis Studies AA.
E. Field Trips No
F. Method of Grading Letter or Pass/No Pass
G. Repeatability Course is not repeatable
III. CATALOG DESCRIPTION
This course examines anthropological perspectives of human cannabis use through time. Topics include the archaeological evidence of cannabis use, cross-cultural and symbolic meanings of cannabis, institutional ideologies, and ethnographic studies of cannabis related behaviors.
IV. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:
  1. Distinguish the four traditional subfields of anthropology as they relate to human cannabis use and users.
  2. Apply the biocultural perspective to current anthropological research questions that address cannabis use and users.
  3. Identify different methodological techniques for studying cannabis through an anthropological lens.
  4. Apply anthropological concepts to understanding the diverse impacts and "daily life" experiences within different cannabis cultures.
V. CONTENTS
  1. Introduction to anthropology: subfields 
    1. Biological anthropology
      1. Medical anthropology
      2. Behavioral/cultural ecology
    2. Archaeology
    3. Linguistic anthropology
      1. Sociolinguistics
      2. Etymnology
      3. Historical linguistics
    4. Cutlural anthropology
      1. Political and legal anthropology
      2. Anthropology of religion
    5. Additional relevant specializations
      1. Applied anthropology
        1. Activist anthropology
        2. Social justice frameworks in anthropology
        3. "Networked" anthropology
      2. Visual anthropology
        1. Photography
        2. Ethnographic film
        3. Visual biographies
      3. Geography and demographics
        1. Human geography
        2. Cannabis statistics and analysis - human
      4. Political ecology
      5. Ethnomusicology
      6. Cultural anthropology
        1. Political and legal anthropology
        2. Anthropology of religion
      7. Linguistic anthropology
        1. Sociolinguistics
        2. Etymology
        3. Historical linguistics
      8. Archaeology
  2. Anthropological methodology and the study of cannabis
    1. Ethnography
    2. Fieldwork
    3. Participant observation
    4. Culture shock
    5. Professional ethics
    6. Qualitative and quantitative data collection
  3. Core concepts in anthropological research
    1. Cultures and subcultures
    2. Ethnocentrism and cultural relativism
    3. Assimilation and acculturation
    4. Enculturation and socialization
    5. Diffusion, adaptation, and syncretism
    6. Holism
    7. Cross-cultural comparisons
    8. Local, global, and globalization
  4. Medical anthropology
    1. Introduction to medical anthropology
      1. The biocultural perspective
      2. Cultural and historical shifts
      3. The medical gaze
      4. Anthropology of pain
    2. Ethnomedicine as a subfield of medical anthropology
      1. Ethnomedical uses
      2. Ethnobotany and cultivation
  5. Evolution of global cannabis cultivation/control
    1. The role of technology in globalized cultivation
    2. Traditional vs. entrepreneurial cultivation
    3. The "developing" world
    4. The "developed" world
    5. Typologies of cannabis cultivators
    6. Challenges for cannabis growers
  6. Archaeological record
    1. Implements, braziers
    2. Organic material/residue ("biomarker" analysis)
    3. Textiles
    4. Evidence of trade routes
    5. Evidence of artificial selection/hybridization
  7. Plant biology and ecology
    1. Folk use of hemp
    2. Ethnobotanical aspects of cannabis
      1. Southeast Asia
      2. Asia
      3. Africa
      4. The Americas
      5. The Caribbean
    3. Ethnomedical studies of cannabis
      1. Cannabis as medicine
        1. Cultural patterns of use
        2. Ethnographic narratives of therapeutic cannabis use
          1. Kleinmann (1988)
          2. Rubin (1975)
      2. Cannabis as folk remedy
        1. Folk taxonomies of cannabis vs. synthetic drugs
        2. The medical marijuana movement
  8. Cultural anthropology and ethnographic studies of cannabis cultures
    1. Early shamanistic evidence of cannabis use
    2. Cannabis in indigenous North American cultures
    3. Use of cannabis in Mexico
    4. Use of cannabis in India
  9. Linguistic anthropology and cannabis culture
    1. Etymology of cannabis
    2. Biblical representations of cannabis
    3. Descriptive language and power
  10. Cannabis culture in the US
    1. Early 20th century attitudes
    2. Middle and late 20th century attitudes
  11. Cannabis culture in Latin America and the Caribbean
    1. External forces
      1. Colonialism
      2. Slavery
      3. Trans-Atlantic trade routes
      4. Tourism and "Otherness"
    2. Case studies
      1. Jamaica
      2. Suriname and Guyana: the Indian dimension
      3. Mexico
      4. Columbia
  12. Cannabis culture in Europe
    1. The UK
    2. The Netherlands
  13. Cannabis culture in Africa
    1. European and American demand
    2. Normal trade channels at war (Afghanistan/Lebanon)
    3. Case studies
      1. Morocco
      2. South Africa
VI. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY
  1. Assignments
    1. In-class activity: Instructor-led small and large group discussions on assigned readings.
    2. In-class activity: Instructor-led media activity (for example: a video, a meme, or other media artifact) that students analyze using one or more of the theories discussed in class.
    3. Out-of-class assignment: Weekly readings of text, journals, and online articles on topics such as Biblical representations of cannabis and the archaeological record of cannabis trade routes.
    4. Out-of-class assignment: Reaction papers on readings or video material presented in class on topics such as applying the biocultural perspective to current anthropological research questions that address cannabis use and users.
    5. Out-of-class assignment: Research project on topics such as the diverse impacts and "daily life" experiences of cannabis users, providers, activists, entrepreneurs, families and others or examining and explaining different methodological techniques for studying cannabis through an anthropological lens.
  2. Evaluation
    1. Written work: Reaction papers on readings or video material presented in class on applying the biocultural perspective to current anthropological research questions, identifying methodological techniques, and applying anthropological concepts to diverse impacts and experiences.
    2. Exams/Quizzes/Tests: A minimum of one test using some combination of multiple-choice, short answer, and/or essay type questions focusing on the content outlined in the course.
    3. Research project: Research project on topics such as the diverse impacts and "daily life" experiences of cannabis users, providers, activists, entrepreneurs, and others or examining and explaining different methodological techniques for studying cannabis through an anthropological lens.
    4. Final Assessment: Final examination using some combination of multiple-choice, short answer, and/or essay type questions focusing on distinguishing the four traditional subfields of anthropology from one another as they relate to human cannabis use and users.
  3. Representative Textbooks and Other Instructional Materials
    1. Goodman, J., Sherratt, A., and Lovejoy, P. (eds.). 2014. Consuming Habits: Global and Historical Perspectives on How Cultures Define Drugs. Routledge.
    2. Golub, A. 2012. The Cultural/Subcultural Contexts of Marijuana Use at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.
    3. Rubin, Vera. 1975. Cannabis and Culture. De Gruyter Mouton.
    4. Website: Marijuana Smoking Rituals in Ancient Western China
    5. Website: Cannabis utilization and diffusion patterns in prehistoric Europe: a critical analysis of archaeological evidence
    6. Website: Phytochemical and genetic analyses of ancient cannabis from Central Asia
    7. Website: Mountain high: oldest clear signs of pot use
    8. Website: Ancient Cannabis 'Burial Shroud' Discovered in Desert Oasis
    9. Website: As marijuana goes mainstream, what’s happening to the way we talk about weed?
VII. TITLE 5 CLASSIFICATION
CREDIT/DEGREE APPLICABLE (meets all standards of Title 5. Section 55002(a))